Albizia procera (Roxb.) Benth
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NO. 66886

Utilization of traditional herb medicines to treat livestock diseases in three villages in East Java province
Pemanfaatan jamu untuk penyakit ternak tiga desa propinsi Jawa Timur

Djarwaningsih, T; Uji, T
Research and Development Centre for Biology, Bogor, Indonesia

Prosiding Seminar dan Lokakarya Nasional Etnobotani [Proceedings of National Seminar and Workshop on Ethnobotany], Cisarua-Bogor, 19-20 February 1992; Nasution, RE et al (eds); Jakarta, Perpustakaan Nasional R.I., 1992; p 97-105

Abstract:
Villagers still use traditional herb medicines to treat diseases of their livestocks in East Java. In the development of these uses, a research was conducted in three villages to know the kinds of ingredient, effectiveness and uses of preparations. The results indicated that there were 34 kinds of herb used as medicines for cattle, 17 kinds for horse and 4 kinds for goat diseases. The analysis of the plants used and cultural and social aspects were discussed. (Modified authors' abstract)

Availability :
Herbarium Bogoriense Library
Email: herbogor@indo.net.id




NO. 61884

Utilization of people's forest products: Two case studies in Java
Penggunaan hasil hutan rakyat: dua studi kasus di Jawa

Kartasubrata, J
Proceedings of the National Seminar on Research and Development of Multipurpose Tree Species; Bogor; 1990; p28-47

Availability :
Forest Research and Development Centre; Bogor; Indonesia




NO. 91752

'Akleng parang' (Albizia procera)


Florido, HB (ed); Arcilla, RP
Research Information Series on Ecosystems 6 (3): 1-5 (1994)

Abstract:
'Akleng parang' is a fast-growing and fairly drought tolerant tree. It is common in regions with pronounced dry season. The wood is used as raw material for forage and for the rehabilitation of seasonally dry eroded and degraded soil.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development; Library
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 94861

Growth and development of Paraserianthes falcataria, Albizia saponaria, A. lebbeck, A. procera and other nitrogen fixing trees as affected by spacing on hillsides in Eastern Visayas, Philippines


Bumatay, EC; Escalada, RG; Buante, C
Proceedings International Workshop on Albizia and Paraserianthes Species, Bislig, Surigao del Sur, Philippines, 13-19 November 1994; Forest, Farm and Community Tree Research Reports, 1997; p 76-79

Abstract:
Distance of planting had dramatic effects on the diameter and height growth of the nitrogen fixing tree species grown under trial. Generally, the wider the spacing, the shorter the trees but the bigger their diameter. Paraserianthes falcataria trees spaced at 1m x 0.5 m grew very tall compared to other spacings. The growth pattern of all the species was observed at each time of measurement not to have followed the biological curve due to stem breakage and other damages caused by typhoons which passed over the experimental site.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 91646

These trees thrive in dry areas


Sarian, ZB
Manila Bulletin, March ?: ? (1998)

Abstract:
The akleng-parang, alibangbang, katuray and kamachile are trees which thrive even in arid regions. They may be used to reforest dry areas. The kamachile yields edible fruits as well as tannins for industrial use.

Availability :
Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development Library
Email: pcarrd@pcarrd.dost.gov.ph




NO. 94851

Wood properties and utilization of Indian albizia species: an assessment in the content of species selection for planting


Bhat, KM
Proceedings;International Workshop on Albizia and Paraserianthes Species;Bislig, Surigao del Sur, Philippines: 13-19 November 1994;Forest,Farm and Community Tree Research Reports;1997;pp. 140-144

Abstract:
Of the 100 Albizia species distributed in the tropics, about 16 species are indigenous to the Indo-Burma region. The data available for nine species shows that majority of the species have medium-density timber with a mean yield air dry specific gravity (SG) ranging from 0.55 to 0.67, although A. mara has rather heavy wood (SG 0.87) and A. stipulata has light wood (SG 0.42). Despite the fact that the timber shows a great range of variation in color, weight, and texture among the species, specimens of different species often integrate in color and show striking similarity in wood anatomical features, which makes separation of species impracticable. The heartwood is brown to dark brown in many species, while light brown heartwood is characteristic of species like A. mara and A. stipulata. Although A. lebbeck is a well known timber in the trade as a substitute for walnut, a good supply of construction timber is from species like A. odoratissima and A. procera.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 94859

Responses of selected Albizia species to the allelophatic substances from Eucalyptus at seedling stage under shade house conditions


Arche, NC
Proceedings;International Workshop on Albizia and Paraserianthes Species;Bislig, Surigao del Sur, Philippines: 13-19 November 1994;Forest,Farm and Community Tree Research Reports;1997;pp. 80-90

Abstract:
The response of six selected species of Albizia, namely, A. falcataria (L.) Fosb. (syn. Paraserianthes falctaria Nielsen), A. julibrissin Durazz., A. lebbeck (L.)Benth, A. lophanta (Willd.) Benth (syn. Paraserianthes lophanta, Nielsen), A. procera (Roxb) Benth., and A. toona Bailey (syn. Paraserianthes toona Nielsen), to the allelophatic chemicals from Eucalyptus camaldulensis were determined from leaf leachate treatments on 1-month old seedlings growing in two different soil types under shadehouse conditions. The experiments were conducted in James Cook University, Townville, Queensland (19§19'30" S and 146§ 43' 15" E). Comparisons between treated and control were made based on growth responses such as seedlings height, length of fourth and fifth leaves, number of leaves, dry matter production, root-shot ratio , and number of leaves, dry matter production, root-shoot ratio, and number of root nodules. To determine differences among species between treatments, factorial analysis of variance was done on all parameters measured. The leaf leachate of E. camaldulensis applied as watering medium was not lethal but otherwise showed varying effects on the growth of the species, except for the root-shoot ratio. Reductions in plant height number of leaves, root dry weight, shoot dry weight, and total biomass were noted in the six species. Nodulation was also inhibited. The response of Albizia spp. seedlings to Eucalyptus leaf leachate application varied among species and soil types. Among the most affected species were A. procera, followed by A. lebbeck whereas A. toona and A. falcataria were least affected. A. lophantha showed some tolerance to the leachate treatment in both soil types.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 94865

Establishment techniques and utilization of Albizia lebbeck, A. procera, and A. chinensis in Bangladesh


Mohiuddin, M
Proceedings;International Workshop on Albizia and Paraserianthes Species;Bislig, Surigao del Sur, Philippines: 13-19 November 1994;Forest,Farm and Community Tree Research Reports;1997;pp. 1-9

Abstract:
Establishment techniques, management, and utilization of three species of Albizia, A. lebbeck, A. procera, and A. chinensis, in Bangladesh are presented. All these species are multipurpose, fast growing, easy to propagate, highly productive, commercially important, and well adapted in Bangladesh. Phenological notes, silvicultural practices, nursery techniques, and pest management aspects are discussed.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 94864

Performance of Albizia species in different soil and ecological conditions of India


Jha, MN
Proceedings;International Workshop on Albizia and Paraserianthes Species;Bislig, Surigao del Sur, Philippines: 13-19 November 1994;Forest,Farm and Community Tree Research Reports;1997;pp. 44-54

Abstract:
The occurrence of Albizia in India can be traced almost to the primodial times. The species has taken full advantage of a variety of eco-climatic situations and has a very wide distribution throughout the country, especially Albizia lebbek. Almost all aspects of the species have been investigated in India. However, this species has yet to find nationwide acceptance as a frontrunner for programs like social forestry, agroforestry, plantation crops like tea and coffee, or as a block plantation species for industrial uses. This article reviews research reported on distribution, site characteristics, geology and soil, climatic preferences, impact on soil fertility, role of the species in ameliorating problem soils, and Albizia as a good fodder and fuel species. Different species of Albizia have been studied regarding sivicultural aspects, but most of the work has been related to Albizia lebbek and A. procera, out of several species found in India. Many workers have tested Albizia with a group of other species for its performance on afforestation of wastelands and amelioration of salt-affected soils. However, in the past decade more and more emphasis ahs been laid on uses of the species as a promising agroforestry component. Mainly spacing trials and impact of fertilizers on growth performance have been undertaken to wok outthe most appropriate tree-crop combination in agroforestry land use. Northeastern India has successfully used Albizia odoratissima and A. chinensis in tea and coffee plantations as well as in terrace crops. This species has also been tried as source of nutritious fodder for livestock in harsh environment. International trials of provenances at nursery stage have shown better performances of Albizia falcataria from Philippines. The assessment of the research on Albizia drives one to conclude that this is promising species for establishment on vast areas of wastelands in India for a variety of returns that it can offer for use by human beings and cattle. Lines of research are suggested that should be taken up to give a rightful place to this species among some of the most popular leguminous species in India.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 94868

Seed treatment for Albizia species


Roshetko, JM
Proceedings;International Workshop on Albizia and Paraserianthes Species;Bislig, Surigao del Sur, Philippines: 13-19 November 1994;Forest,Farm and Community Tree Research Reports;1997;pp. 37-43

Abstract:
The common seed treatment methods include cool-water soak, acid soak, nicking and no treatment. To determine which of these methodss are appropriate for propagating albiaza in community-level tree planting programs, a seed treatment study was conducted on Albizia lebbeck, A. procera, A. saman and A. saponica. Of the seed treatment method tested, nicking was most effective at producing rapid, uniform seed germination and germinant development. Unfortunately, nicking is time-consuming and only practical for small to medium quantities of seed. Although inferior to nicking, the hot-water treatment also produced good results and is easily applied to large quantities of seed. When propagating large numbers of albiaza seedling, seed should be soaked in boiled water for 3 minutes followed by 24 hours in cool water. Stir seed during the hot-water soak. The volumes of hot and cold water should be five times the volume of seed.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 94919

Direct seedling of forest trees in grass land communities of Carranglan, Luzon Island


Bguinon, NT
Proceedings;International Workshop on Research on Multi-purpose Tree Species In Asia;Los Baños, Philippines;19-23 November, 1990;Taylor,DA. And Mc Dicken KG. (eds);Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development: 1991 pp. 139-147

Abstract:
This paper studies of 12 indigenous forest tree taxa taxon (Cicca cucida). A direct seeding experiment was begun in June 1990 in Carrangalan, Nueva Ecija and was monitored for 16 weeks to determine survival rates. Seeds of each taxon were sown in four blocks of varying vegetative cover (Themeda and Imperata grassland), soil and slope aspets (east and west). After 16 weeks, Voacanga globosa, or Bayag-usa, showed the best survival, 69%. It was followed by: Guioa koelreuteria (57%);Bombax ceiba (47%); Wrightia pubescens ssp. laniti (45%); Pterocymbium tinctorium (31%); Madhuca etis (23%); Macranga tanarius (11%); Leea guineensis and cf. Glochidion (13% each); Albizia procera, (5%); Parkia roxburghii(1%); and Chiocheton pentandrus and Cicca acida, which had no survival.

Availability :
College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños, College




NO. 94558

Collection and processing of indigenous tree seeds


Baggayan, RL
Technology Transfer Series 10(2): 1-14(1999)

Abstract:
seed collection and processing are some of the important activities in establishment of forest plantation. This guide presented some technologies in seed collection and processing of indigenous tree species that include selection of mother trees, collection of fruits/seeds handling, extraction and processing, storing and transporting, economic benefits, marketing considerations, seed sources and ecological implications.

Availability :
Technology Transfer and Information Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources




NO. 93712

Species and provenance trial of selected fuelwood species


Tumaliuan, BT
Sylvatrop 10(1): 35-48(1985)

Abstract:
Species and provenance trial of selected fuelwood species was conducted in Cabagan Forest Research Station, Cabagan, Isabela in July 1981, to determine adaptability of these species in this area. The results showed that ipil-ipil [Leucaena-leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit] and akleng-parang [Albizia procera (Roxb.) Benth] had the highest field survival (80%), followed by kakawate [Glericidia sepium (Jacq.) Steied] 65% and agoh [Casuarina equisetifolia Forst.] 53%. Despite its relatively low survival, agoho (53%) out-performeed the other species in height and diameter growth. In the provenance level, agoho Mindoro and Laguna had shown exceptional survival, height and diameter growth over agoho Quezon. For kakauate, Nueva Viscaya and outgrew the other provenances.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau; Forestry Campus




NO. 95952

Species trial planting in the vintar watershed


Agpaoa, AC; Pe¤afiel, SR; Noble, BF
Abstract of Research on Environment and Natural Resources in the Cordillera Region; Department of Environment and Natural Resources,Cordillera Administrative Region; Ramos,HC(ed); (undated); La Trinidad,Benguet,Philippines; pp.8

Abstract:
A species trial planting study involving seven species: Gmelina arborea, Albizia procera, Pterocarpus indicus, Leucaena leucocephala, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Pinus caribaea and Casuarina equsitifolia was conducted for a period of two (2) years using survival and early height growth as bases of selection.|In terms of survival, Eucalyptus camaldulensis had the highest with 85%, follwed by Gmelina arborea with 79%, one year after planting. For height, Eucalyptus camaldulensis performed the best with an average seedling height of 111.73 cm. The other species gave as high as 50% survival, but height growth and vigor were not encourgaing to warrant scale planting.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau; Forestry Campus




NO. 95972

Species trial planting in Binga-Ambuklao watershed areas


Veracion, VP; Mamateo, BP; Bersamia, JB
Abstract of Research on Environment and Natural Resources in the Cordillera Region; Department of Environment and Natural Resources,Cordillera Administrative Region; Ramos,HC(ed); (undated); La Trinidad,Benguet,Philippines; pp.19

Abstract:
The study was conducted to compare the survival, grwth rate and form of 8 selected species, namely: Eucalyptus camaldulensis, E.tereticornis, Pinus kesiya,P.carribaea, P.oocarpa, Gmelina arborea, Albizia procera and Derris cumingii.|Based on the tabulated results, E.camaldulensis, E.tereticornis and ALbizia procera have 95, 90 and 80 average percent survival, respectively which which are significantly higher than the other species with 66 and below percentage survival.|The results on height growth was significant at 2.77% on the minor treatment and 0.05% on the major treatments. The height growth (in cms.) for the species are as follows: E.camaldulensis (76.40), E. teriticornis (57.39), P.oocarpa (40.18), G.arborea, (37.05), P.caribaea (23.95), D.cumingii (22.16), P.kesiya (13.28) and A.procera (11.77).

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau; Forestry Campus




NO. 96710

Micropropagation of superior bagras tree clones


Capuli, FA; Calinawan, NM
Proceedings 15th STARRDEC Regional Symposium on Research and Development Highlights, Cavite State University, Indang, Cavite, Philippines. 15 August 2002

Abstract:
Micropropagation is a true-to-type propagation or cloning of superior trees using tissue culture techniques. To develop a protocol for the micropropagation of bagras, the sterilization of explants amd induction of multiple shoots using growth hormone were dealt with. Trials using explants from mature superior trees of bagras were conducted. Field trials were conducted in Mt. Makiling and Llavac, Quezon.

Availability :
Southern Tagalog Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium One Stop Information Shop




NO. 96705

Micropropagation of superior bagras tree clones


Capuli, FA; Calinawan, NM
Proceedings 15th STARRDEC Regional Symposium on Research and Development Highlights, Cavite State University, Indang, Cavite, Philippines. 15 August 2002

Abstract:
Micropropagation is a true-to-type propagation or cloning of superior trees using tissue culture techniques. To develop a protocol for the micropropagation of bagras, the sterilization of explants and induction of multiple shoots using growth hormone were dealt with field trials.

Availability :
Southern Tagalog Agriculture Resources Research and Development Consortium One Stop Information Shop




NO. 96090

Effects of mulching on the survival and growth of camachile, kakawate and akleng parang wildlings in denuded areas


Calacal, LP
Ilocos Research Abstracts 1986-1987; Mariano Marcos State University, Batac, Ilocos Norte; 1987; Dy, MEY (ed); Ilocos Norte; Philippines; p. 67

Abstract:
The effect of different mulch materials (cogon/grass, dried branches and twigs, and banana leaves) on the survival and growth of three species were tested in denuded areas. The three species were camachile (Pithocellobium dulce (Roxb. Benth), kakawate (Gliricidia sepium (Jacq. Steud.) and akleng parang (Albizia procera).|Percent survival, average height and diameter growth were measured 10 times from 1982 to 1985. Kakawate had the highest field of survival (93.2%) when mulched with banana leaves; 93.0%, when mulched with cogon/grasses; and 75.5%, when mulched with dired branches and twigs. This was followed by akleng parang which had a field survival of 79.6% when mulched with cogon/grasses; 74.4%, when mulched with banana leaves; and 68.9%, when mulched with dried branches and twigs.|Camachile had the lowest survival rate of 44.4% when mulched with dried branches and twigs; 34.4% when mulched with cogon/grasses; and 33.0%, when mulched with banana leaves. Nonetheless, percentage survival of treated plants was higher than that of unmulched plots.|All the species performed best when mulched with dried branches and twigs. However, kakawate outperformed the other species in height and diameter growth.

Availability :
Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau, College of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of the Philippines Los Baños